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  • Writer's pictureBrian Dooreck MD

Heartburn, GERD, Acid Reflux—Are They Dangerous?

Updated: Jul 25, 2023



What is GERD?


Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) occurs when the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxes or does not close properly, and stomach contents reflux into the esophagus. The LES is a ring of muscle at the bottom of the esophagus that acts like a valve between the esophagus and stomach, preventing food and acid from flowing back into the esophagus.


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What is heartburn?


Refluxed stomach acid in the esophagus causes a burning sensation in the chest or throat called heartburn. The fluid may even be tasted in the back of the mouth (acid) or described as regurgitation or indigestion.


Refluxed stomach acid in the esophagus causes a burning sensation in the chest or throat called "heartburn."

Is GERD or heartburn dangerous?


Occasional heartburn is common. However, heartburn more than twice a week is considered GERD. It can lead to more severe health problems, including strictures from chronic scarring, Barrett’s esophagus (a precancerous condition), and even esophageal cancer.


Occasional heartburn is common. Heartburn more than twice a week is considered GERD.”

What causes GERD?


A hiatal hernia occurs when the upper part of the stomach is above the diaphragm, the muscle wall that separates the stomach from the chest. Other factors include alcohol, obesity, pregnancy, smoking, citrus fruits, chocolate, caffeine (coffee and cola), fatty and fried foods, garlic, onions, peppermint, spicy foods, and tomato-based foods (sauce, chili, and pizza).


How is GERD treated?


If you smoke, quit. Weight loss and smaller meals may help. Wear loose-fitting clothes and avoid lying down for 3 hours after a meal. Raise the head of your bed 6 to 8 inches by putting blocks of wood under the bed; extra pillows alone will not help. Depending on how severe your GERD is, treatment involves the above lifestyle changes, medications, or surgery.


GERD, heartburn, health, microbiome, gastrointestinal gi system, endoscopy by a gastroenterology doctor or gastroenterologist

Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPIs) are very effective drugs for those who suffer from acid reflux and heartburn. There have been many articles on the safety of these medications. I will write about this in the near future. For now, if you need them, use them. If required for the long term, check with your doctor.


Personally


I eat a high-fiber, mostly plant-based 🌱 diet, no red meat, drink 4 liters of water a day, exercise, and am focused on keeping nutrition simple. I am sharing what works for me and what I routinely recommend to my patients.


"Balance. Portion control. Keep nutrition simple. Eat Smart. Eat Healthy. 🌱 🌾 🌿"

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