top of page
  • Writer's pictureBrian Dooreck MD

The Keto Diet and You

Updated: Jul 24, 2023


IBS, gas bloating, health, microbiome, gastrointestinal gi system, see your gastroenterology doctor or gastroenterologist
A ketogenic (keto) diet is high in fat and protein and low in carbohydrates.

What can happen from a lack of carbohydrates?


Carbohydrates frequently receive a poor image, particularly regarding weight gain.


If you entirely remove carbs from your diet, your body will start to burn more fat for energy. Ketones are formed when fat is broken down to fuel your body.


"I hope to add real value to social media and share what my patients ask me about." — Dr. Dooreck


Gut Health ➕ Patient Advocacy with Navigation ➕ Life Balance

 

If you were looking for information about Private Healthcare Navigation and Patient Advocacy from Executive Health Navigation


Having served as doctors for over a decade, we help Family Offices, Private Individuals, Registered Investment Advisors, High-Net-Worth Advisors, and C-Suites navigate the healthcare system for their select clients/families, providing privacy and discretion.


Private Healthcare Navigation and Patient Advocacy when YOU need it most


 

For a sustainable, balanced, healthy approach to eating and weight — it is OK to consume both carbs and fat

Is the keto diet sustainable?


The ketogenic diet is difficult for most people to be ethical in the long run, and the long-term benefits or harmful consequences on health are unknown. Carbohydrates aren’t all terrible. Carbs have a valuable impact on various health benefits.


Moreover, the premise is that consuming both carbs and fat is acceptable for an ethical, balanced, and nutritious approach to healthy weight management. Be sure to pay attention to portion control and avoid processed foods.


Types of Carbs


There are three sources of carbohydrates:

  1. Sugar

  2. Starch

  3. Fiber


Sugar is the most basic type of carbohydrate and can be found in various meals, including fruits, vegetables, milk, and milk products.


Starch is a complex carbohydrate that comprises several combined sugar units. Natural sources of starch include vegetables, rice, and potatoes.


Fiber is a complex carbohydrate as well. It naturally exists in fruits, vegetables, dry beans, and peas.


What happens when I follow the keto diet?


The keto diet has been proven to produce fast results in the short term, such as weight loss. However, there are repercussions of the diet and metabolic change:


  1. The keto diet forces your body to burn fats rather than carbohydrates.

  2. While this diet may help you lose weight, the high level of unhealthy fats paired with fruits and vegetables harms your health in the long run.

  3. The food travels down to the liver to break down stored fat into molecules known as ketones in a process called “ketogenesis.”


The USDA recommends less than 30% fat, 20-35% protein and at least 50% carbs.

Check out this video from the Science Insider “What The Keto Diet Actually Does To Your Body.”



How about “Keto Breath?”


Many people who follow a ketogenic diet notice that their breath has a “fruity” scent. This is due to high ketone levels, known as acetone. Acetone is a ketone found in both urine and breath. As a result, more significant amounts of ketone and acetone are responsible for the infamous “keto breath.”


What should I do after a few weeks of trying the keto diet?


It is highly recommended that you change your lifestyle to one that is more ethical and balanced in the long term. Ask yourself, how am I feeling? Are there signs of fatigue, hunger, or anxiety? Drink a lot of water. Make healthy decisions. Concentrate on portion control and increase your level of physical activity.


What are the healthiest sources of fat?


  • Olive oil

  • Avocados

  • Nuts (almonds, walnuts)


Make wise decisions


Carbohydrates are essential to a balanced diet because they contain various nutrients. However, not all carbs perform the same task.


Here’s how to incorporate healthy carbohydrates into a well-balanced diet:


  1. Fruits and vegetables high in fiber should be prioritized. Go for whole, fresh, or frozen fruits and veggies with no added sugar.

  2. Choose low-fat dairy products. Milk, cheese, yogurt, and other dairy products contain calcium, protein, vitamins, and minerals.

  3. Stick to whole grains. Whole grains have more fiber and other vital elements, such as B vitamins, than refined grains.


IBS, gas bloating, health, microbiome, gastrointestinal gi system, see your gastroenterology doctor or gastroenterologist
This looks more "balanced" to me.

What should you remember about the keto diet?


A diet causes “ketones” to be released into the bloodstream.


In the short term, you will experience weight loss from a calorie deficit of approximately 500 calories per day. For now, it’s likely safe to practice the keto diet—ideally with the help of a dietitian or nutritionist.


However, it is not a long-term viable, healthful, or nutritional option. Keeping weight off on the ketogenic (keto) diet will be difficult, not to mention dangerous.


Personally


I eat a high-fiber, mostly plant-based 🌱 diet, no red meat, drink 4 liters of water a day, exercise, and am focused on keeping nutrition simple. I am sharing what works for me and what I routinely recommend to my patients.


"Balance. Portion control. Keep nutrition simple. Eat Smart. Eat Healthy. 🌱 🌾 🌿"

Gut Health ➕ Patient Advocacy with Navigation ➕ Life Balance


If you were looking for information about Private Healthcare Navigation and Patient Advocacy from Executive Health Navigation


Connect with Dr. Dooreck on LinkedIn, where he focuses his sharing on Health, Diet, Nutrition, Exercise, Lifestyle, and Balance.


 

gastroenterology | colonoscopy doctor | colonoscopy and gastroenterology services | gastro doctor | gi doctor | gastrointestinal diagnostic centers | public health

7 views

Comments


bottom of page